Hannah Mossman and Chris Panter, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia. Photocredits: David White, Helen Mossman, Chris Panter

Our audits and reports are available for download below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breckland

(9MB)

First BBA Report 1 021210.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Broads

(6MB)

Biodiversity audit report.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fens

(6MB)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANTA

(9MB)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fens Network

(6MB)

Fens mapping report.pdf Fens Biodiversity Audit report.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J. Appl. Ecol. Oct 2012

Evidence-base for conservation

Breckland, c.1000 km² with semi-continental climate and sandy soils, supporting heathland and arable communities, with fluctuating waterbodies supporting fen and relict post-glacial biota.

 

The Broads, c. 800 km², an important wetland complex of grazing marsh, fen, wet woodland and open water.

 

The Fens., c. 3800 km², formerly extensive wetlands, now intensive agriculture, with fragments of relic fen grazing marsh and washlands, and an extensive ditch network totalling more than 20 million km.

 

Three Regional Audits completed to date

Regional biodiversity is much greater than previously recognised

Examining just two of the three regions in the table below, the Brecks and the Broads, we show that the scale of “Biodiversity” in a region is an order of magnitude greater than previously recognised:

 

 

Total number of species

Regionally restricted

Conservation priorities

 

Broads

Breckland

Broads

Breckland

Broads

Breckland

Fungi & Lichens

2135

1961

0

2

48

69

Lower & Higher Plants

1700

2144

11

13

232

296

Arthropods

6544

8208

50

56

1019

1543

Other invertebrates

222

165

3

0

15

12

Vertebrates

466

367

2

1

205

177

Total

11607

12845

66

72

1519

2097

Hotspots of Breckland Regional Specialists

 Red areas - high numbers of specialists

 

Hotspots of saline vulnerable species of conservation priority species in the Broads

Red areas - high numbers of species

Biodiversity Audit of Breckland showed that heathland management prescriptions have poor cost effectiveness, as they are unsuitable for most of the priority biodiversity; identified neglected management guilds including species requiring ruderal ungrazed conditions, and mapped the distribution of priority species and regional specialists (left). Further work quantified numbers of priority invertebrates and plants that would benefits from management for SPA umbrella species.

 

Work in the Broads assessed species tolerance  to saline intrusion and mapped hotspots of saline vulnerable species (right) to supports strategic adaptation and mitigation measures.

 

Biodiversity Audit of the Fens showed the neglected importance of littoral habitats, and mapped the potential value of the agricultural landscape for connectivity (middle).

Distribution of predicted wetland biodiversity compared to a proposed ecological network - (white lines). Blue areas - high biodiversity.